THE PROBLEM OF A START-UP: Struggling & Scramble

When There is No History to Analyze

THE PROBLEM OF A START-UP: Struggling & Scramble

When There is No History to Analyze

Scramble
70 percent of upstart tech companies fail, along with 97 percent of seed crowdfunded companies.
Struggle
What and where have been the mistakes the failed group which could not succeed?
All start-ups are similar in a common point: they all start with one idea, but statistics show that the founders of those start-ups are actually heading to failure instead of leading their business to victory, and they usually find out about it when it's too late. The worst news is that the number of start-ups that fail is higher than what you previously thought. Griffith (2015) says that nine out of ten start-ups will fail.
"CB Insights found that 70 percent of upstart tech companies fail, along with 97 percent of seed crowdfunded companies." (McCarthy, 2017)
Even today, although specialists are more hopeful about the future of high-tech companies, they are no better than other start-ups. CB Insights found that 70 percent of upstart tech companies fail, along with 97 percent of seed crowdfunded companies (McCarthy, 2017).
Now, the critical question is why that tiny group did not fail? The answer to such an important question certainly does not fit in one line. That is why the reader is expected to respond with patience, careful study, and compelling analysis.
Every successful business you see today was once a start-up. Thousands of start-ups are competing every day around the world, but how many of them can reach the tenth year? Small Business TRENDS began collecting statistics from start-ups in the United States from October 2016 to May 2018, which had started in 2011. While these numbers may be different elsewhere in the world, it seems unlikely to be apparent differences.
Just over 50% of start-ups have failed in the first four years. Surveys show that 4% managed to reach the second year, 3% to the third year, 9% to the fifth year and only 3% of those companies managed to see the competition in the fifth year. (Mansfield, 2018)
Although numerous articles and books have been written on start-ups, most have presented their experiences as motivational rather than scientific and practical. Few books have addressed the importance of market appreciation and marketing knowledge in the success of start-ups, and most have tried to tell audiences what to do through successful case studies. But knowing what not to do is essential, too.
That is why this book seeks to answer an even more critical question: what and where have been the mistakes the failed group which could not succeed?
It is attempted to provide the required theoretical training to the audience in Chapter 2. The last chapter attempts to teach the reader how to apply scientific learning in a competitive market. Since implementing systematic marketing, the system requires a budget, strategy development, risk management, and experience shows that implementing it in start-ups is not feasible, even if practical. The reader will become familiar with the new term "Neo-Marketing" in this book. Neo-Marketing, although it doesn't want to be as dependent on marketing as we know it today, has nothing to do with Growth Hacking. Neo-Marketing has simply updated marketing that is not necessarily applied to a particular type of economic system or a specific country or great companies; it is what start-ups can also use practically.
In this book, all efforts have been made to utilize the experiences of start-up founders, mentors, and investors, so from 2015 to 2016, alongside his research, Toomaj conducted a number of interviews with well-known and even unknown individuals in different countries, many of which are mentioned in this book.
Although writing this book began in May 2015, its completion been delayed due to a series of challenges, such as Toomaj's being diagnosed with multiple sclerosis. "THE PROBLEM OF A START-UP: Struggling & Scramble" will be released in late 2020.

Just over 50% of startups have failed in the first four years.

failed in the first four years 50%
failed in the the second years 96%
failed in the the fifth years 97%

Is your startup struggling with marketing and finding investors?